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150 Years
catman
seeker: No, I was referring to the 'tie' I had to wear as an "honorary pallbearer" at a funeral I went to yesterday. Pfft It was horrible...I haven't heard so many Bible readings in decades. I hate all that pious crap read by people who hardly knew the deceased (if at all). Vultures circling above the corpse, IMO, trying to pick off the most vulnerable of the grief-stricken.
Edited by catman on 04/22/2011 01:47
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
Bob of QF
catman wrote:
seeker: No, I was referring to the 'tie' I had to wear as an "honorary pallbearer" at a funeral I went to yesterday. Pfft It was horrible...I haven't heard so many Bible readings in decades. I hate all that pious crap read by people who hardly knew the deceased (if at all). Vultures circling above the corpse, IMO, trying to pick off the most vulnerable of the grief-stricken.


I see christbot celebrations of the dead like this:

1) they are quite happy it is not they lying in that gilt-and-tinsel-covered wooden box
2) their deepest wishes are that death isn't really real
3) so they lie to themselves and say it's not real
4) if they can convince someone else of the lies they are telling themselves? That helps keep the lie that much more believable

All the while they are moaning about "he's in a better place" they belie that statement with crocodile tears-- to be sure, those that really knew the dead guy, the tears are quite likely to be real. But not always-- sometimes those closest to the dead, are the ones feeling the most relief that he's finally dead and they can now inherit.

So they lie about "better place" and they lie about feeling bad he's dead.

Is it any wonder those places are so full of tension?

----------------------

If these liars truly believed the shit they were tying to sell?

All funerals would be a party-- a celebration that the dead (who usually were sick at some point, and miserable) is no longer feeling pain-- and they-- if they really loved him like they claim they did-- and they would be happy for his new pain-free and immortal status.

But they don't-- they are miserable because they feel the loss and they are in pain-- selfish? You betcha.

Christianity is all about selfishness, at the most basic level.

What is more selfish, than telling yourself that the Ultimate Creator of Everything gives a rat-fart in a septic tank what sort of fabric their underwear is made of?

Or worse-- that this Ultimate Being.... actually listens to their pathetic mewlings...

.... and here's the worst selfish idea of all: not only listens but changes It's mind in response to their cries!

I mean think about it:

If their god was going to do whatever anyway? There'd be need to pray at all, is there?

But. They expect an answer to their prayers-- meaning, that they actually think, they are convincing their god to do something he had not planned on doing!

............

And that, my friends, is Ultimately Selfish.
Quantum Junction: Use both lanes

Reality is that which is left, after you stop believing.
 
seeker
catman wrote:
Aw. c'mon, seeker, it's a tie. Wink I think it could be done "civilly" if both sides decided it would be a civil separation. That doesn't necessarily mean it would turn out that way. The fragmentation of Yugoslavia didn't work out too well, but I doubt that anyone thought it would.

Cynic: Good analysis!


The problem is that its very rare for people to actually give up power. In the case of Czechoslovakia that country had been artificially assembled by the axis powers after WWI and the had no choice in staying together through the German then subsequent Soviet occupations. I'm only suggesting that there were special circumstances surrounding that split. More often such separations are bloody affairs.
"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." - George Santayana
 
catman
seeker wrote:In the case of Czechoslovakia that country had been artificially assembled by the axis powers after WWI and the had no choice in staying together through the German then subsequent Soviet occupations. I'm only suggesting that there were special circumstances surrounding that split. More often such separations are bloody affairs.

I agree completely. I was just suggesting that it possible for the split to be nonviolent, but that would go against human nature.

Bob of QF: Quite right! I rather like the New Orleans funeral, in which there is a big celebration/party after the burial. I've played tuba in a traditional jazz bband for a few of them! That's the way it should be.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
JohnH
Again I am lucky. None of the funerals I have attended in the last 15 years has been in a church. In fact the last church funeral I went to was that for an uncle in law in an Orthodox church in the neighborhood of 20 years ago. He was a decent man and I got the opportunity to kiss the corpse. I will admit that I did not put lips to flesh but I did kiss my hand and placed that hand on his face.

No close friend or relative will have a religious funeral for the remainder of my life. I find this personally comforting.
 
Hypatia
The best funeral I ever attended was for a massage therapist friend/former classmate who was also a horsewoman and died a month after being thrown from a horse. Her memorial was held outside one of her horse stables at her home, with the mourners surrounded by her horses roaming around us. Almost the entire time there was a horse nibbling on and drooling on my shoulder. I never did figure out why that horse thought I was so tasty, but the entire 'service' was very befitting someone who wasn't religious and loved horses and bodywork. Though we were saddened by her death, the gathering truly was a celebration of everything she was, and it was the largest gathering of horse and massage people I've ever seen in one place.
 
catman
The funeral I went to on Thursday wasn't at a church. It was at a funeral home. But it could hardly have been more religious. I suppose that comforted all the (other) old people, but not me. It gave me a headache.

My ambition is to wear out all my body parts at the same time.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
Hypatia
catman wrote:
The funeral I went to on Thursday wasn't at a church. It was at a funeral home. But it could hardly have been more religious. I suppose that comforted all the (other) old people, but not me. It gave me a headache.

My ambition is to wear out all my body parts at the same time.


Are you keeping yourself tuned up and rotating your tread regularly?

Wink
 
catman
No, but all of me is running rough to the same degree.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
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