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Obama's Acceptance Speech
Bob of QF
Skeeve wrote:
Bob of QF wrote:

I'm like Jon Stewart (of Today's Show),


That's like Jon Stewart of The Daily Show too.Grin


I sit corrected. LOL!
Quantum Junction: Use both lanes

Reality is that which is left, after you stop believing.
 
derF
Does he have two shows?
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
catman
T_E: Sam Cooke was indeed a great singer. I think he was a prime influence on Steve Perry of Journey.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
Theory_Execution
I cant say I have ever heard of Steve Perry, Journey or any of the songs I just had a quick listen to on yoob.

He is good, but to my ear a shade under Sam.
 
Cynic
You've never heard of Journey? Wow. I'm old.

Anyway, I was kind of wondering about Jesse Jackon's reaction. He's said a number of things over the course of the election that gave the certain impression that he didn't like Obama, so I guess my first reaction to his crying was that he was thinking "it was mine! My election! Should have been my presidency! Why HIM!?!"

I'm sure he's a bigger man than that, but... wait, I'm actually not sure he is. But I guess I'll give him the benefit of the doubt.

I read an analysis of the speech giving it high marks for being at a 7th-grade level (as opposed to 8th or 9th. I guess I can see the utility of that, but damn...
 
seeker
I'm sure Jackson had mixed feelings but at heart his lifelong work was for civil rights. I think seeing a black man get elected president must have been a overwhelming feeling for a guy like Jesse Jackson.
 
catman
[quote]Cynic wrote:Anyway, I was kind of wondering about Jesse Jackon's reaction. He's said a number of things over the course of the election that gave the certain impression that he didn't like Obama, so I guess my first reaction to his crying was that he was thinking "it was mine! My election! Should have been my presidency! Why HIM!?!"[/quote]
That had to be part of it. He was likely crying in part because he knew that time had passed him by. He should take comfort in knowing that without him, MLK, and others, there would be no Obama presidency.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
derF
Cynic wrote:
You've never heard of Journey? Wow. I'm old.

Anyway, I was kind of wondering about Jesse Jackon's reaction. He's said a number of things over the course of the election that gave the certain impression that he didn't like Obama, so I guess my first reaction to his crying was that he was thinking "it was mine! My election! Should have been my presidency! Why HIM!?!"

I'm sure he's a bigger man than that, but... wait, I'm actually not sure he is. But I guess I'll give him the benefit of the doubt.

I read an analysis of the speech giving it high marks for being at a 7th-grade level (as opposed to 8th or 9th. I guess I can see the utility of that, but damn...


You want to date yourself? Steve Perry was Journey's second lead singer. Their first lead singer was Greg Rollie who originally sang and played keyboards for the original Santana band that performed at Woodstock.

Rollie later used his influence, along with another former Santana alumni Neil Schon (guitars) along with former Santana manager Herbie Herbert to produce Journey and achieve as much success as they had with Santana. Listen for him on Black Magic Women and Oye Como Va and other great Santana hits. He only gave up his career when he had absolutely exhausted himself with nearly 30 years of cutting edge music with Santana and Journey and finally decided to give it a rest.
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
Cynic
I've contemplated the idea of dating myself. One of the pros, I've decided is that at the conclusion of the evening, if I'm in the mood, I'm at least assured of a handjob. Wink

Hey, Santana's good too. I had no idea about the history of Journey. Caught them on the way out more so than in their heyday.
 
Skeeve
Lemme try this dating thing.

Genesis was ahelluva lot better before Phil Collins took over as frontman.

I didn't like the direction they went after [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Gabriel]Peter Gabriel[/url] left in the 70's.

Look for some early Gabriel Genesis tracks and you'll know what I'm talking about.
Edited by Skeeve on 11/09/2008 08:49
"The world is my country, and do good is my religion." - Thomas Paine
 
seeker
Absolutely right Skeeve though I'd specifically point to Steve Hackett era Genesis. Anthony Phillips was a great guitarist as well but Genesis best albums (IMO Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and Selling England by the Pound) were with Hackett as lead guitarist.

In any case Peter Gabriel was far and away the better vocalist.
 
Bob of QF
Okay, okay, I got you all beat:

I remember the landing on the moon as a CURRENT EVENT.

Heck, I even remember the old Gemini astronauts.

I also remember reading about Sputnik in what I considered to be a current National Geographic magazine (but I just barely missed it in person). And it was one of those old, dead-tree editions, too... Grin

I also remember when "singers" like The Carpenters had number one hits.

Heck, I even had some Beatles 45's, and they were still relatively fresh. And the Rolling Stones, before Keith Richards was embalmed.

And Lawrence Welk was a weekly TV event in my house (parents loved it).

And TV only had...let me think...3 channels plus "PBS" which wasn't really an actual channel, as it did not broadcast all the time.

I remember when the very FIRST UHF station came on the air (later to become Fox network). They passed out those silly circular-wire UHF antennas out at all the local convenience stores for free.

*sigh*
Quantum Junction: Use both lanes

Reality is that which is left, after you stop believing.
 
Cynic
I remember peering through the curtains at a friend's house when I was 7 with him while his older brother watched a broadcast KISS concert on TV, who in turn was watching it against his parent's permission because they were "satanic". I think that's why I liked That 70's Show. It's like going back in time and spying on the older kids all over again...
 
seeker
Bob of QF wrote:
Okay, okay, I got you all beat:

I remember the landing on the moon as a CURRENT EVENT....


I was 12
 
derF
We's a bunch a' geezers.
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
comfortable
catman wrote:
Cynic wrote:Anyway, I was kind of wondering about Jesse Jackon's reaction. He's said a number of things over the course of the election that gave the certain impression that he didn't like Obama, so I guess my first reaction to his crying was that he was thinking "it was mine! My election! Should have been my presidency! Why HIM!?!"

That had to be part of it. He was likely crying in part because he knew that time had passed him by. He should take comfort in knowing that without him, MLK, and others, there would be no Obama presidency.

Glad I'm not the only 'cynic' here.
My wife and I were wondering to each other what JJ was really thinking. I too remember his earlier comments about Obama.

(No surprise, I guess, but wifey and I both contributed a small amount on Obama's website.)

Racism?
We both voted for Obama, neither one of us would ever vote for Jackson.
Edited by comfortable on 11/09/2008 14:14
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The fewer the facts, the stronger the opinion.
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Men are sheep in credulity, but wolves for conformity.
 
Cynic
Too little information to tell. Smile I remember thinking that Jackson was basically unelectable, which I still feel is accurate. Much was made of Obama's ability to really get people to "see him" as the president of the United States leading up to the election. While I take their intent on face value, we don't see a lot of observations like that in races where it's old white guy versus old white guy.

In a way it's almost insulting, but it's a practical and realistic hurdle he had to overcome. And I don't think Jackson could have overcome it. First, he's "hopelessly" associated with the civil rights movement, which while not a bad thing, does imply a certain kind of intractable bias and agenda. People, overall, don't want to elect someone whose agenda is anything other than being the best president they can be. While those aren't mutally exclusive, we weren't given much of an alternative side. Second, as much as people wanted to assail Obama and Palin for not having much experience, at least they had SOME. Jackson wanted to leap directly into the highest spot in the land from completely outside of it.
 
comfortable
Agreed.

I find it fascinating.
The McCain campaign, in its final stretch, became "polarizing" (e.g. Real America/small town America vs. "them")

Wouldn't it be a wonderful statement about the electorate that they rejected polarization and tribalism in favor of reasonable and inclusive intelligent discourse?

Ahhhh...I'm getting silly. That's too optimistic.

But Obama stayed cool in all public appearances while McCain seemed 'agitated' (and perhaps a bit angry). That was probably a big factor.

So Mr. In Control of himself vs. Mr. Angry Grandfather - and the skin color was not enough to sway enough voters.

Thoughts?
Edited by comfortable on 11/09/2008 15:04
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The fewer the facts, the stronger the opinion.
.
Men are sheep in credulity, but wolves for conformity.
 
Cynic
In all reality, think most people had their minds made up shortly after the primaries had ended. But towards the end, I think the degree to which people were comfortable with their decisions became increasingly disparate. Obama supporters had been given plenty of reasons to feel that he had excellent potention, while McCain supporters were forced to cling to the fact that McCain was the Republican, so that's who they're voting for.

While I doubt people were thinking in terms of tribalism, there were many polls and articles strongly correlating the negative campaigning of McCain as being offputting to both sides, regardless of who they were voting for. More tellingly, the negativity was inevitably characterized as being both devisive (polarizaing) and fear-based as opposed to nearly opposite polling suggesting that Obama was inclusive (anti-tribal) and hopeful.

While the word "hope" took a beating this cycle, that's precisely the tone he took most of the time, and I think that at least 55% of the country is enjoying the feeling of being inclusive and forward-thinking.

I dunno. No doubt the feeling will pass, but haven't felt this "hopeful" in quite some time. This is the first election where I've seen people wearing campaign buttons and wished I had one.
 
comfortable
I didn't do the campaign button thing, nor knock on doors. Just donated once and ignored the further exhortations (SPAM) to donate some more. My wife and I donated just to "be a part of it" - not because we thought they lacked funds.

You're probably right.

I would add that people don't often understand, themselves, why they feel the way they do/did. They might have been strongly and subliminally swayed by the demeanor of the candidates without realizing it.

It's interesting that in spite of those who voted for Obama because of his skin color, and those that voted against him for exactly the same reason (just as any other single-issue voter e.g. abortion) - that this could actually happen in my lifetime.

I remember my shock at the age of 12, when I visited my father in Texas, and had my first exposure to "white" and "colored" facilities. Shocking to a 12-year-old from the Los Angeles area.

People, by and large, are not thoughtful nor inclusive in their willingness to grant others the same validity as themselves - but somehow it is finally possible to elect a dark-skinned president. We must at least admit that we're significantly better as a society in some important respects.
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The fewer the facts, the stronger the opinion.
.
Men are sheep in credulity, but wolves for conformity.
 
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