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Country music & religion
Doubting Thomas
OK, first off, let me just say that I absolutely hate country music, and pretty much always have. But, since I have many family & friends who listen to it, I'm constantly exposed to it. Otherwise I wouldn't have this gripe.

Why does every other country song have to be about God or religion? Countless recent country tunes make some kind of mention either about God, Jesus, the bible, etc. Whatever happened to country music of the 80's when it was all about getting drunk & cheating on your wife?

I mean, the most absolutely stupid song I've heard recently is "Jesus Take the Wheel" about some young girl who ostensibly doesn't have much faith driving on icy roads, starts to spin out and all of a sudden throws her hands up in the air & yells "Jesus take the wheel!" Of course she comes to a stop unhurt. What would have been smarter was to remember what she was taught in driver's ed and kept control of the car, take your foot off the gas and don't brake too hard. But then I guess she couldn't claim "it was a miracle" that she wasn't killed. I know, I know, the whole "Jesus take the wheel, I can't do it all alone" is really an allegory for her life, which is something I find totally stupid. Yes, you can get through life without Jesus, since he doesn't exist. You don't need to rely on useless prayer since it never has any effect on the outcome of events.

I could go on & on about other stupid religious country songs, but I think I'll instead put on some Black Sabbath & jam to some good ol' devil music.
You're just jealous because the voices are talking to me and not you.
 
neilmarr
***Why does every other country song have to be about God or religion?***

Gayus, DT, not too many thangs rahm with atheist, huh?

Neil
 
seeker
DT - I think the political situation in this country influenced the religiosity of country music a great deal. Country music became pretty stridently pro-Republican, especially in the last decade. Just at what happened to the Dixie Chicks.

 
catman
I agree. The Dixie Chicks got their revenge, I'd say.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
Bob of QF
Well, I can't stand the basic whining of a 2-year old tone that most country "music" seems to fall in to, so I don't listen to it, either.

The "jesus take the wheel" typifies the mindset, though.

What would a 2 year old DO in a scary situation? Why, run to mommie, of course!

Ergo, xianists and country music: the mentality of whiny, bratty spoiled 2 year olds.

It's a match made in ..... well, Tennessee?

'nuff said.
Quantum Junction: Use both lanes

Reality is that which is left, after you stop believing.
 
derF
Well, I used to like some country western music. Johnny Cash was very religious but there were a lot of his songs and covers that I really liked. Waylon Jennings , Willie and others produced music that I liked. I still listen to Highwayman (the joint effort by Cash, Jennings, Christopherson and Nelson. Just a very nice composition. But the last decade or so country has drifted into that nasally, fake drawl bull shit that pervades the Country station. Happily, some the the newer younger artists are injecting better composition and musicianship into their music and I have actually heard a few songs that weren't half bad.
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
catman
But we still have Shania Twain to look at.

Yes, I liked Johnny Cash a lot. I didn't at first because of his technical limitations, but when I began thinking of him more as a poet/folksinger type, it helped. He had a sense of humor, too. I thought Hank Williams was atrocious when I first heard him, but likewise with him. Rascal Flatts are very good vocally. Taylor Swift is not very good, Jessica Simpson is awful, and they have no authenticity to make up for it, which is a very important quality in country music.

I liked Marty Robbins (The Western in C & W); he was an excellent singer with a beautiful voice. I heard him sing alone with his guitar in a radio station and he was spellbinding.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
Nails3Jesus0
Doubting Thomas wrote:
OK, first off, let me just say that I absolutely hate country music, and pretty much always have. But, since I have many family & friends who listen to it, I'm constantly exposed to it. Otherwise I wouldn't have this gripe.

Why does every other country song have to be about God or religion?


I feel the same way as you DT. Can't stand it. I grew up with a step-father that would listen to nothing else. More than anything else, I learned to hate it, as function of my youthful rebelousness against my over bearing and over the top step father. Now I just hate it because of the overt right wing and self rightous tone that country music has taken on. Plus, it just plain sucks as a music genre.
I think because C&W has it roots in rural, blue collar America, it has hitched its wagon to small town religiosity and attached it to patiotism and nationalism. One thing is for sure: Nashville record producers know their audience. I don't see their brand going out any time soon. No shortage of small minded rednecks here that gooble it up!
 
RayvenAlandria
I like the sound of country music but not trend towards religion. I used to listen to country at times but I could not take the religious crap and stopped listening quite a few years back. I think the reason the genre is so religious is that most rednecks are conditioned to listen to country. They stay within a social bubble that includes uneducated blind faith, so it spills over into their music.

I like many types of music, gothic, techno, trance, pop, (used to enjoy country), jazz, some rock, (but kind of outgrew heavy metal), soft, etc...about the only thing I really dislike is soprano opera singers, they hurt my brain. (no joke, the sound triggers a migraine).
 
Doubting Thomas
I like classic rock, like the rock I grew up with, jazz, classical but not opera. I like listening to symphonies but I don't want anyone singing in it, I guess.

Yes, I guess with the resurgence of overt religiosity that occurred after 9/11 helped country music become more and more religious just like the Republican party.
You're just jealous because the voices are talking to me and not you.
 
catman
I like classic rock too, DT. I think you are right, since religion and patriotism are so intertwined; after 9/11, they both became more heavily promoted, especially in the largely conservative country music genre. Lee Greenwood and his ilk, dontcha know. Urk.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
derF
Did anyone see the movie about Johnny Cash they made a few years ago called Walk the Line. Joaquin Phoenix starred as Johnny. I found it very interesting that at that time there wasn't a lot of division amongst the various artists. Buddy Holly would do concerts with Waylon Jennings or Elvis or Johnny Cash and the audiences were happy to have any of them entertaining them. They just liked the music. I don't think it was until later that they started to get separated when some insisted on classifying them as Pop or Rock or Country or whatever. Almost sounds like some sort of conservative plot.
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
Doubting Thomas
I think it was a conservative conspiracy so they'd know later what to label as "devil music." Smile Don't ya know that Rock & Roll was named that because that's what horny teenagers listened to while they had sex in cars? I actually heard someone make that claim before.
You're just jealous because the voices are talking to me and not you.
 
seeker
Funny DT. The term rock&roll was actually a euphemism that musicians used as early as the 20's for sexual intercourse. I had a friend who used to collect very old vinyl and specialized in these very suggestive songs. Some of them were quite hilarious, pushing sexual innuendo to the limit without ever quite getting really nasty.
 
derF
Rock-and-Roll [räk'n roll'] n. first so used (1951) by Alan Freed, Cleveland disc jockey, taken from the song "My Baby Rocks Me with a Steady Roll". The use of rock, roll, rock and roll, etc., with reference to sexual intercourse, is traditional in blues, a form of popular music that evolved in the 1950's from rhythm and blues, characterized by the use of electric guitars, a strong rhythm with an accent on the offbeat, and youth-oriented lyrics.
Edited by derF on 11/19/2008 21:31
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
JohnH
OK I will admit that I have 3 large, 1 medium, and 2 traveling boxes to contain my 45's.

I offer for your consideration and enjoyment "It will stand" by the Showmen. If I could do links I would try to hook you up.
 
Doubting Thomas
Old blues songs are rife with euphemisms for sex. For example, there was a song about a "jelly roll" which was a euphemism for the vagina.
You're just jealous because the voices are talking to me and not you.
 
catman
The noted early jazz pianist Jelly Roll Morton wrote and performed a popular song called Ain't Gonna Give Nobody None Of My Jelly Roll, so I always thought it referred to the male genitalia. I suppose it can mean either, or the person him/herself.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
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