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ISS Photos of Volcano Eruption in Russia
Hypatia
These photos, taken by the International Space Station as it passed over an erupting volcano in Russia, are just amazing.

[url]http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1195215/Stunning-pictures-hole-clouds-astronauts-witness-volcano-eruption-International-Space-Station.html[/url]

Framed by a circle of clouds, this is a stunning illustration of Nature's powerful force.
A plume of smoke, ash and steam soars five miles into the sky from an erupting volcano.
The extraordinary image was captured by the crew of the International Space Station 220 miles above a remote Russian island in the North Pacific.


At the end of the piece is a photo of a dark molecular cloud, that looks like a hole in the universe.
 
derF
Saw this photo on the news tonight. Just awesome. The power of mother nature is truly breathtaking. And the circumstances that led up to this remarkable photo are nothing less than mathematically impossible.
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
catman
I cannot agree with that...after all, the photos were taken, and volcanic eruptions are not especially rare. Still, a gorgeous series of images.

In case anyone cares, the Kurile Islands were Japanese until 1945.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
Hypatia
Apparently this particular volcano is very active, but for this particular eruption the ISS just happened to pass over at the right time and captured the images. Looks like there will be a lot to learn from these pics.

Catman wrote:

In case anyone cares, the Kurile Islands were Japanese until 1945.


That is interesting Cat.

 
derF
catman wrote:
I cannot agree with that...after all, the photos were taken, and volcanic eruptions are not especially rare. Still, a gorgeous series of images.


Think about it catman. A tiny little planet in a tiny little solar system located on the outer fringes of a run of the mill galaxy manages to exist long enough to evolve a life form that develops the capability of space flight and during the orbit of the one and only manned spacecraft happen to find themselves directly over an erupting volcano in order to photograph it. I can't calculate the odds, Catman, but I would describe them as looooooooooooooooooong.
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
catman
Well, I suppose so, but I don't think we are all that special. With as many galaxies and stars in the universe as there are, there are bound to be many otherplanets with highly evolved lifeforms, and I feel sure that some of them are far ahead of us.

My point was that the International Space Station passes over the entire circumference of the Earth every 90 minutes, so it isn't that surprising that it would pass over an active volcano now and then. That takes nothing away from the beauty of the photos.
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
derF
We'll never know how special or how run-of-the-mill we are . But I vote for the former.

I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
catman
If it pleases you to think so, go for it. But I don't think votes count, since there is no one to count them.Grin
"If I owned both Hell and Texas, I'd live in Hell and rent out Texas." - General Sheridan
 
Bob of QF
Too Cool, Hypatia.

Thanks for the link.
Quantum Junction: Use both lanes

Reality is that which is left, after you stop believing.
 
Hypatia
You're welcome. Glad you enjoyed them.

 
derF
catman wrote:My point was that the International Space Station passes over the entire circumference of the Earth every 90 minutes, so it isn't that surprising that it would pass over an active volcano now and then.


Being one who loves to pick nits, Catman, I must point out that the ISS orbits at about 250 miles above the earth's surface. The station is about the size of two football fields therefore its orbit takes it directly over only a very small, narrow band of the Earth's surface. And for them to be directly over a large eruption as in the photo just when it was happening is an extremely remote possibility.
I'll drink to that. Or anything else for that matter.
 
wuzyla55


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Edited by Skeeve on 07/30/2010 10:13
 
catman
derF: I don't know about "extremely remote", but I didn't intend to minimize the special nature of the occurence. That being said, the size of the ISS doesn't have much to do with it. A height of 250 miles is more germane, since its field of view of the surface is fairly wide, even with the qualifier of "directly above". Conflating that with all the other stuff concerning how unlikely our existence may be only serves to obscure the issue. But since I may seem to be minimizing the special nature of the occurence, I'll stop now. Cry
 
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